menu-hamburger-svgrepo-com

WEBINAR REPLAY

Webinar replay: Identifying and treating skin lesions due to sun damage in different skin types

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Presented by

:
:
DAYS
HRS
MINS

BOOKINGS

skin lesions

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in Caucasians. It does occur in people of colour, although the relative risk is low. Skin cancer in skin of colour is associated with increased morbidity and mortality due to late presentation, atypical presentation, late treatment, and refusal of treatment (for example amputation).  

Prevention and increased surveillance are essential, by means of regular skin exams by clinicians, self-examination, public education, and screening programmes.  

Patients should seek medical attention for a non-healing ulcer (three weeks), new moles, changing moles, and changing lesions (oozing, bleeding, crusting).  

Risk factors​ for skin cancer are increased sun exposure, especially to fair-skinned individuals, skin conditions that result in scarring or chronic inflammation, burn scars​ and post-radiation therapy.  

Ultraviolet (UV) chronic exposure​ is a risk factor for nonmelanoma skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma [BCC], squamous cell carcinoma [SCC] and actinic keratosis [AK]), melanoma ​and photoaging.  

Actinic keratoses  

This is the proliferation of cytologic atypical keratinocytes in the dermal-epidermal junction zone. The risk of progression to SCC increases with the increase in the number of AKs.  

Management of widespread AK​  

  • Destructive therapies: Cryotherapy, surgery, dermabrasion, laser​ 
  • Topical therapies: 5-Fluorouracil, imiquimod, diclofenac​ 
  • Chemical peels​ 
  • Photodynamic therapy. 

Albinism  

This is a lack of pigment or pigment dilution due to a defect in the synthesis of melanin leading to a congenital absence of pigment in the skin and eyes.​  

Cancer risk is 23.4% in this group, increasing with age, due to cumulative exposure to UV radiation and inability to tan.​ SCC is more common than BCC​ here and occurs more commonly on the head. Melanoma is rare.  

Xeroderma pigmentosum​  

This is a rare inherited disease that causes extreme sensitivity to the sun’s UV rays.​ Without sun protection, the skin and eyes are severely damaged.​ These patients develop freckles at an early age and the sun damage leads to the early onset of cancer of the skin and eye.  

SCC ​  

This cancer is more common in people of colour and is not always in sun-exposed areas. It is more common in the lower legs, the anogenital region, and the head and neck.   

Risk factors ​include scarring (discoid lupus erythematosus, leprosy, burns​), non-healing ulcers, radiation therapy, organ transplant​ recipients, albinism, and patients with xeroderma pigmentosum.  

Weakened immunity ​  

Patients with depressed immunity, such as organ transplant patients ​or those with HIV are at risk for SCC, Kaposi sarcoma, BCC, and melanoma.  

BCC  

This condition is less prevalent than SCC. Exposure to UV light is a major aetiological factor​  

Predisposing factors ​include fair skin and albinism, xeroderma pigmentosum, trauma and long-term ulceration, radiation therapy, arsenic ingestion, nevus sebaceous, basal cell nevus syndrome, and immunosuppression.  

It is more common in females over 50, on the lower legs. The skin in these patients is usually pigmented.  

Melanoma in the skin of colour  

Melanoma is the third most common type of skin cancer in all racial groups, and the most deadly. It is 5-18 times less common than in Caucasians. The aetiology is undetermined in the skin of colour. Areas of involvement​ include hands and feet (acral lentiginous) including under the nails (misdiagnosed as warts or fungal infection)​and mucous membranes.  

There is a good chance of survival if detected early. Decreased survival is due to aggressive disease, late presentation​ and wrong diagnosis.  

To watch the replay of this webinar and still earn a CPD point, go to the replayhttps://event.webinarjam.com/go/replay/339/lp6vpb06sn9tqrik 

Please note webinars are only CPD accredited for a calendar year. This webinar has unfortunately expired, but can still be watched for information purposes.

Sign in to access full articles and earn your CPD points.

Clinical and CPD content is compiled by Key Opinion Leaders and our expert medical editors.

Already registered? Login here

Past webinars

Suggested clinical & CPD content

CPD: Activitypt

Related articles

idea

1000’s of Clinical and CPD content compiled by Key Opinion Leaders and our expert medical editors.

connection

Access to medical webinars and events

Group 193

Access medical journals from industry leaders and expert medical editorials.

Congratulations! Your account was successfully created.

Please check your email for an activation mail. Click the activation link to activate your account

Stay up to date

Search for anything across CPD, webinars and journals
idea

1000’s of Clinical and CPD content compiled by Key Opinion Leaders and our expert medical editors.

connection

Access to medical webinars and events

Group 193

Access medical journals from industry leaders and expert medical editorials.

Congratulations! You have successfully booked your seat.

All webinar details will be emailed to your email address.

Did you know, you can book future webinars with a single click if you register an account with Medical Academic.

Congratulations! Your account was successfully created.

Your webinar seat has been booked and all webinar details will be emailed to your registered email address

Why not register for Medical Academic while booking your seat for this webinar?

Future Medical Academic webinars can be booked with a single click, all with a Medical Academic account… and it’s FREE.

Book webinar & create your account

* (Required)

idea

1000’s of Clinical and CPD content compiled by Key Opinion Leaders and our expert medical editors.

connection

Access to medical webinars and events

Group 193

Access medical journals from industry leaders and expert medical editorials.

Congratulations! Your account was successfully created.

Thank you for registering. You can now log in to your account.

Create your account

* (Required)

Login with One Time Pin (OTP)

Enter your registered email address to receive an OTP

A verification code will be sent to your email address. Please ensure that admin@medicalacademic.co.za is on your safe sender list.

We've sent your OTP
Welcome to Medical Academic​

Get the most out of Medical Academic by telling us your occupation. This helps us create more great content for you and the community.