NPWT in hand injuries

The efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is thought to be due to decreased bacterial count, increased tissue perfusion, removal of exudates, and promotion of granulation tissue formation, all of which promote wound healing.

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CPD POINTS: 0

Fungating wounds always a challenge

A patient presenting with a fungating wound is always a challenge for wound care practitioners. The management of these wounds is rarely straightforward and requires a great deal of sensitivity and flexibility.

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Using dressings to manage pain in diabetic foot ulcers

Proper management of diabetic foot ulcers is an essential but often overlooked component of diabetic wound care. Wound dressing technology is constantly advancing and there is no reason why diabetics should suffer complications resulting from ulceration or even amputation as a result of their condition.

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CPD POINTS: 1

Foam dressings a MUST in the wound care toolkit

Globally millions of people develop pressure injuries. Foam dressings have been shown to reduce the risk of pressure injuries.

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CPD POINTS: 3

Spider bites in SA: Identification and treatment

Diagnosing spider bites can be very difficult, especially when you do not know what caused the bite. It could be a mosquito bite, flea bite, or even poison ivy.

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Knowledge leads to better outcomes

During the last 10 years there has been a dramatic increase in the number and types of burn wound dressings available on the market.

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A brief history about efficacy of NPWT

Most guidelines recommend negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for acute and chronic wounds.

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Wound assessment crucial to effective treatment

Proper wound assessment can significantly influence patient outcome. Remember that accurate descriptions are essential for guiding ongoing wound care.

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The superficial partial thickness burn and Sorbact

Thermal damage to the skin that just breaches the dermis but leaves many islands of basal epithelial cells intact is named a partial thickness burn. Due to the multitude of these islands, re-epithelialisation occurs within 7-14 days and the largely intact dermis means the scar is of good quality. This is the natural history of a truly superficial partial thickness burn.

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First aid for minor burns

Burns are a global public health problem, accounting for an estimated 265 000 deaths annually. A burn is an injury to the skin or other organic tissue primarily caused by heat or due to radiation, radioactivity, electricity, friction, or contact with chemicals.

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Burns: basic first aid

Burns destroy skin, which controls the amount of heat our bodies retain or release, holds in fluids and protects us from infection. While minor burns on fingers and hands are usually not dangerous, burns injuring even relatively small areas of skin can cause serious complications.

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Fast burn treatment decreases mortality

Data shows that on average, nine children die every day from of burn injuries. Research shows that men, children and old people are more at risk of sustaining burn injuries.

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Burns: The long term

Hypertrophic scars are variations of typical wound healing when there is an imbalance between the anabolic and catabolic phases and more collagen is produced than is degraded. This is a difficult problem for burn patients.

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Burns: The first 24 hours

Burns remain undertreated

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Burns: The first 24 hours

It is imperative to understand the depth of the burn wound. A partial thickness wound will heal spontaneously. The most appropriate dressing choice is one that can be applied as a single application and is only removed once epithelialisation is complete.

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Think Again

A study by Emma Gee Kee et al, Randomised controlled trial of three burns dressings for partial thickness burns in children published in Burns (2015), compared the effects of three silver dressing combinations on small to medium size acute partial thickness burns in children, focusing on reepithelialisation time, pain and distress during dressing changes.

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CPD POINTS: 3

Burning Issue

For those who survive major burn injury recovery is characterised by considerable aesthetic, functional and psychosocial challenges. This paper overviews selected considerations when managing the patient with an extensive burn injury.

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